Brain and Body Health Connection – A Personal Moment About Gut Health

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I updated my original post because it felt empty after reading it. I provided my story, I needed to give you more of the why? Why is gut health important and what steps can you take to begin to get there. Starting with my own accountability to doing better.

The original…

I’ll be standing firmly on two feet soon (old pic) and while my foot’s healing, my system needs to as well. I’m speaking about “gut health”.

I have an intolerance to gluten. I’m not allergic, I can eat it, but it’s better for my system if I don’t. When the discovery was made years ago, I shared this with my then nutritionist, and she explained how this is a contributing factor to the slowing of my metabolism. I’d start off well, finding new alternatives to wheat which led to my love for Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s, but sure enough the old habits started coming back. Now years later having developed other issues, it all starts replaying in my mind.

Gluten isn’t the sole cause of my issues and being older ….and wiser, I’m discovering my on-again, off-again digestive issues such as Gerd and non-acid reflux, coupled with an inflammatory illness, can no longer be chalked up as a thing that happens after I eat certain foods. I’m learning how certain foods that I put into my body over time (along with hormones, and environment) have affected my system. I’m seeing a change with dairy products as well. I’m see that I’m headed towards being lactose intolerant; OK, who am I kidding, I’m probably there, but in denial.

I’ve come to accept that implementing change is more than reaching a goal on a scale, it’s about implementing lifestyle changes, that include getting educated and being consistent in what I do and eat. And I admit, I haven’t been good with consistency. Repetition begets a habit and I need to get into a habit of eating what’s healthy for my root, a new term that as I’ve learned. 

To paraphrase Dr. Vincent Pedre, a gut health expert; “in comparing our bodies to a tree you wouldn’t heal a tree by putting medicine on its leaves, you tend to it from the roots. Our digestive system/gut is the root of our bodies and that’s where our focus should begin. He says, “our gut lining is the biggest absorptive surface exposed to the outside world through what we eat. If we’re eating inflammatory foods, add in stress, GMO’s, food additives and coloring, it’s cooked up a leaky gut that leads to toxins, and more entering our system.”

The added…

Studies are showing the link between gut health, mental health, autoimmune diseases, endocrine disorders, skin conditions, cancer, and the immune system.

We’re in a new space of learning that our bodies have evolved to live in harmony and depend on bacteria, fungi, and viruses in and on our bodies—especially gut bacteria. And that there’s both good and bad bacteria that affects our guts. Bad bacteria can come from external influences such as food, environmental toxins and even from effects of stress on our bodies which can lead to an unhealthy gut impacting your mental health, weight, mood and a number of other digestive disorders. Good bacteria which our bodies depend on for essential metabolic functions, helps to:

  • combat obesity
  • improve symptoms of depression,
  • Improves mood and mental health
  • Boosts energy levels
  • Improves cholesterol levels
  • Regulates hormone levels
  • Reduces yeast infection occurrences
  • Improves oral health
  • Contributes to longer life
  • reduces or eliminates gloating, gas, constipation and diarrhea.

So if you’re like me, wondering what can be done to improve not only my gut health, but my whole-body health, as there is so much information in the universe to absorb; I’ve discovered a few tips that can be used as a baseline that will help as you continue to do your own research and easily incorporated into your everyday practice. And remember if you are having continual stomach and/or inflammatory issues it’s important to see a gastroenterologist.

Food Tips for Good Gut Health

  • Eat more veggies
  • Eat more fiber (whole grains, nuts, legumes)
  • Eat Pre-biotic Rich Foods* which are found in non-digestible foods such as:
  • Bananas, onions and garlic,
  • Jerusalem artichoke
  • Apple skin
  • Chicory Root
  • Beans

Eat Pro-biotic Rich Foods* – which are found in fermented foods such as:

  • Yogurt – but avoid those with high fructose corn syrup, sugar, artificial sweeteners
  • Kefir – a fermented yogurt-like drink
  • Sauerkraut
  • Miso soup
  • Kimchi
  • Pickles
  • Kombucha – a tea-like probiotic drink
  • Soft fermented cheeses (like Cheddar, Swiss, Parmesan and Gouda)
  • Cottage Cheese (only those labeled “Live active cultures”)
  • Buttermilk
  • Reduce junk, fatty and sugary foods
  • Drink more water

*There are also pre and pro-biotic supplements you can take but do your research first.

I know this is a marathon and not a sprint, but after going around like a hamster on a wheel, I say if now when, otherwise I’ll be continually discussing my issues instead of taking my conversation further into how I’m doing hence my changes. Taking it one step at a time.

 

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