Alzheimer’s: Every Minute Counts on PBS January 25th

 

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Alzheimer’s is a progressive brain disease that causes a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. It is the 6th leading cause of death with no known cure. It is not a normal part of aging and because of the increase of those afflicted with the disease, the cost of care is rising.

Tomorrow on PBS for anyone who I dare say wants to know more about the disease, its effect on caregivers, on families, the rising cost of care, and how that will affect us all then please turn the dial, or set your DVR to, Alzheimer’s:Every Minute Counts, as I say welcome to the world that we advocates live in.

Alzheimer’s: Every Minute Counts, premiers tomorrow January 25, 2017, at 10p ET, and it’s an urgent wake-up call about the national threat posed by Alzheimer’s disease. Many know the unique tragedy of this disease, but few know that Alzheimer’s is one of the most critical public health crises facing America. This powerful documentary illuminates the social and economic consequences for the country unless a medical breakthrough is discovered for this currently incurable disease.

See the video: www.pbs.org/video/2365872329/

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Harris Tea Company Joins the Fight Against Alzheimer’s

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It’s the season of giving back which is the perfect time to tell you about a company that is giving back to helping the Alzheimer’s Association®s vision of a world without Alzheimer’s.

Harris Tea Company is as passionate about giving back as they are about creating the perfect blend of tea and from June 1, 2016 – May 31, 2017, they are donating 10 cents from each box sold of Harris Green Tea, Decaffeinated Green Tea and Decaffeinated Black Tea to the Association with a minimum annual donation of $25,000.

Harris Tea Company, sources teas from regions spanning the globe to create savory comforting blends. Their experts cultivate relationships with suppliers all over the world, to create each unique blend of tea that is then proudly blended and packaged in the U.S.A. in their GFSI (BRC) certified facility.

With over 150 years of combined tea experience, those of us in the fight against Alzheimer’s would say Harris Tea’s support and advocacy for the Alzheimer’s Association® is their best blend to date.

Harris Tea Company, is a regional branded tea leader located in Moorestown, New Jersey. To find out where you can buy their tea or to learn more about their company, visit their website at Harris Tea Brand.

Or send them love for their support on Facebook at HarrisTea .

The Alzheimer’s Association®  is the leading voluntary health organization that works on global, national and local levels to enhance research, care and support for all those affected by Alzheimer’s and other dementias. The Association is committed to accelerating the global progress of new treatments, preventions and ultimately, a cure.

 

US Olympic Gold Medalist Laurie Hernandez Dances in Honor of Her Grandmother

 

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US Olympic Gold Medalist Laurie Hernandez’ grandmother Brunilda passed away last Wednesday. It was her intent to try to see her grandmother as soon as she could, having been away in LA for the show and knowing she was battling Alzheimer’s. The day after she gave an interview about that, her grandmother passed.

Last Monday on Dancing With the Stars she and her partner Val Chmerkovskiy gave a show-stopping performance of the fox-trot. The duo wore purple in honor of her grandmother and to bring awareness to Alzheimer’s. The routine was awarded a perfect score of 30. To see the full performance go here.

“Tonight was a little hard. Sometimes you just don’t know what to say. So instead of saying anything, I danced my way through it,” Hernandez told People.  November is also Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month.

Marty Schottenheimer battling early-onset Alzheimer’s

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http://www.nfl.com/videos/nfl-videos/0ap3000000729296/Rapoport-Marty-

At first I was going to leave the title just as it is on NFL.com, Schottenheimer battling early-onset Alzheimer’s, but then I realized there are some who won’t know who Schottenheimer is. This is another sad note in the song of Alzheimer’s. For those unfamiliar, Marty Schottenheimer was a former linebacker who played with the Bill, Patriots, and Colts before retiring in 1971. He spent spent 21 seasons as an NFL head coach, and was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease five years ago. He is reportedly expected to begin a trial of a new drug that could slow down the debilitating effects of the disease, for as we know there is currently no cure for the disease.

His wife Pat told ESPN Cleveland’s Tony Grossi, “He’s in the best of health, (but) sometimes he just doesn’t remember everything.” “He functions extremely well, plays golf several times a week. He’s got that memory lag where he’ll ask you the same question three or four times. Added Pat,”He remembers people and faces, and he pulls out strange things that I’ve never heard, but he’s doing well. It’s going be a long road. We both know that.”

The 1986 Cleveland Browns reconvened this past weekend for a 30-year reunion of the last Browns team to win 12 games, and Schottenheimer joined some of his former players and coaches including Earnest Byner, Felix Wright and Reggie Langhorne.

Upon hearing the news of Schottenheimer’s condition, Wright and Langhorne insisted that their former coach join them, telling Marty’s son and Colts offensive coordinator, Brian, “Your dad has to come to this. We all want to see him.”

After leaving the Browns following the 1988 season, Schottenheimer spent 11 years in Kansas City, during which he coached the Chiefs to seven playoff appearances, one season with the Redskins and five years in San Diego. He last coached professional football in 2006 when he went 14-2 with LaDainian Tomnlinson and the Chargers before being fired following an early playoff exit.

Schottenheimer concluded his coaching career with a .613 winning percentage and 5-13 record in the postseason. No Browns coach has posted an overall winning record since his departure in 1988.